Digital Alchemist

(in exile)

  • 20th October
    2014
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  • 20th October
    2014
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newyorker:

Hua Hsu on scenes from the New York City’s pre-gentrification graffiti subculture:

“I remember seeing stickers by COST and his partner, REVS, everywhere: on buildings, trucks, cranes, ladders, lampposts, crosswalk signals, stop signs. It troubled me that I could not decode their meaning. What were they selling? When I learned that the answer was nothing, I was confused and then astonished.”

Photograph courtesy Artists Public Domain/Cinema Conservancy

newyorker:

Hua Hsu on scenes from the New York City’s pre-gentrification graffiti subculture:

“I remember seeing stickers by COST and his partner, REVS, everywhere: on buildings, trucks, cranes, ladders, lampposts, crosswalk signals, stop signs. It troubled me that I could not decode their meaning. What were they selling? When I learned that the answer was nothing, I was confused and then astonished.”

Photograph courtesy Artists Public Domain/Cinema Conservancy

(via newyorker)

  • 17th October
    2014
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  • 17th October
    2014
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  • 15th October
    2014
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  • 14th October
    2014
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The story of Cassandra, the woman who told the truth but was not believed, is not nearly as embedded in our culture as that of the Boy Who Cried Wolf—that is, the boy who was believed the first few times he told the same lie. Perhaps it should be.
In her cover essay on silencing women in the October 2014 issue of Harper’s, Rebecca Solnit once again proves that she is one of our era’s greatest essayist – further evidence here and here. (via explore-blog)
  • 14th October
    2014
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  • 14th October
    2014
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  • 14th October
    2014
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  • 14th October
    2014
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